Health Library - UWS Connected Whole Health

Our safety plan as we all begin returning to campus  COVID POLICY

Health Library

Resources for patients and health care providers

This information is presented for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or prescribe for any medical or psychological condition, nor to prevent, treat, mitigate or cure such conditions. The information contained herein is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a doctor or qualified health care professional. Therefore, this information is not intended as medical or health care advice, but rather a sharing of knowledge and information based on research and experience. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your judgment and research in partnership with a qualified health care professional. Please do not stop, adjust or modify your dose of any prescribed medications without the direct supervision of your health care practitioner.

For Patients

Patient-Centered Care: For the Good of the Patient

Author: Bill Moreau, DC, DACBSP, FACSM

In a new blog series, Dr. Bill Moreau, UWS chief medical officer, will provide his thoughts from the field of integrated health care and his longstanding experience providing top-tier health care.

Read more.

Osteoarthritis (OA) and Exercise 

Author: Emma Scaro, DC

It is a common misbelief that exercise should be avoided with osteoarthritis (OA). In fact, one of the best conservative treatments to help with OA is exercise! There are many benefits to staying active with this degenerative process. The most recent studies indicate that light to moderate aerobic exercise is recommended for those with OA. Some activities include biking, swimming and walking. To Learn more about aerobic exercises and how to utilize them with OA. Talk to your health care provider about other forms of exercise, such as resistance training, that can help increase the stability in your affected joint.

Read more.

Some of the best ways to combat inflammation comes from the grocery store

Author: Emma Scaro, DC

While there is no specific “diet” for people with arthritis and other inflammatory concerns. Many of the anti-inflammatory foods include tomatoes, olive oil, green leafy vegetables, almonds, walnuts, fatty fish and fruits. What happens is your immune system becomes activated when your body recognizes anything that is foreign—such as an invading bacteria, pollen or chemicals. This in turn can trigger a process called inflammation which is how our body protects our health. Foods that cause inflammation can include refined carbohydrates (white bread and pastries), fried foods, sugar-sweetened beverages, red meat, processed meat, margarine and lard. Fruits and vegetables such as blueberries, apples and leafy greens that are high in natural antioxidants and polyphenols the protective compounds found in plants are especially useful.

Read more.

Should I Sit or Stand?

Author: Jesse Gordon, DC

Your muscles that keep your posture get tired after prolonged periods of sitting or standing. This contributes to the neck and back pain that is rampant in our society. Studies at Stanford university and Cornell university have found that taking a small microbreak every 30 minutes can help you be more productive, have better concentration, reduce incidence of back and neck pain and ultimately help keep you active and healthy. A typical microbreak should include some aspect of the following: standing up and reaching for the floor, rotating your torso back and forth, walking to get a drink of water and/or looking at an object 20 feet away for 20 seconds (the muscles in your eyes can get tired too).

Read more.

­­Got Headaches?

Author: Jasmine Piper (chiropractic intern)

Almost everyone will experience a headache at some point in their life, ranging from uncomfortable to unbearable. Fortunately, you do not have to live with this discomfort. Researchers have confirmed that there are over 150 different types of headaches with the most common causes being from stress, medications, diet, lack of sleep and posture. Connected Whole Health can help you. A few of the most effective and natural solutions for dealing with headaches include increasing chiropractic care, water intake, magnesium and B-vitamins. Chronic dehydration is the common cause for tension and migraine headaches. Drinking water has been shown to relieve headache symptoms in 30 minutes to three hours depending on the level of dehydration. Low levels of magnesium have been reported as a risk factor for migraine headaches. Eating plenty of magnesium rich foods like avocados, spinach and nuts can keep headaches under control. B- vitamins can help protect you from headaches by reducing stress and improving your overall mood. Eggs, lean meats and green vegetables are all high in B-vitamins and can be incorporated into your diet. Research shows that chiropractic care is an effective treatment for tension type headaches from the neck  by spinal adjustments, postural exercises and relaxation techniques. Now is time to take back control of your life and begin living headache-free!

Read more.

­­Heartburn Got You Up?

Author: Sarah Crockett (chiropractic intern)

“Heartburn” is a feeling of burning discomfort felt in the upper chest and sometimes throat most commonly present when you are lying down. Nighttime heartburn can adversely affect sleep and cause dysfunction in our day-to-day activities. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is when the stomach acid or food flows back up into your throat from your stomach, causing the pain known as “heartburn”. So why does it occur? Most commonly it is due to indigestion of certain foods. Common irritating foods include acidic foods, such as tomatoes or citrus fruits, dairy, fast food, caffeine and chocolate. It’s best to avoid these foods for your last meal, which should be consumed at least two hours before going to bed. Some additional risk factors include smoking, obesity, pregnancy and certain medications. While having heartburn once in a while is common, consistent symptoms could lead to more serious conditions.

Read more.

­If The Shoe Fits…Run In It

Author: Glenn Kasin, DC

One of the most overlooked and important decisions for new runner’s is using proper footwear to avoid injury and make your runs more enjoyable. There are so many brands on the market today and it can be quite overwhelming to pick a pair of running shoes. Everyone’s feet are shaped differently, so there is no one shoe that works well for everyone. Choosing the right shoe depends on many different factors; type of runner, running surface, foot shape, foot strike along with many others. To find a proper shoe go to your local specialty running store to have an experienced running footwear specialist help you. Proper sizing includes having roughly a thumbnails space in front of your toes with an upper that wraps around your foot and holds it firmly place.  Try around three different shoes on in the store because after three they all start to blend. Find something that feels good as soon as you slide it on and walk around the store for a few minutes. Look to see if you have any noticeable extra movement in the heel or are they feel too snug. You want a shoe that feels great the second you put it on, because if it does not feel great now, its’ probably not going to feel better after you been running in them!

How Long Does A Running Shoe Last?

Author: Glenn Kasin, DC

Running shoes are designed to last roughly 300-500 miles which equates to approximately four to six months for someone who runs 20 miles per week. To reduce the risk of injuries, make sure you replace your shoes once or twice per year. Your body will thank you for it in the long run. Signs your running shoes are worn out include new aches and pain after a run, the treads are worn out, the shoe feels stiffer or you are getting new blisters. For more information, go check out local experts like Portland running company. Talk to Dave or Paula! They have been in the running game forever and can point you in the right direction.

For Health Care Providers

Defining the Elite: Normative Values for Scat Major Components in Healthy Elite Athletes

Moreau W., Walden T. & Nabhan D. (2017, June). Br J Sports Med 2017, 51 (11) A74; DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-097270.192.

Describe normative baseline SCAT 2 and 3 (SCAT) performance in elite athletes.

Access article.

Improved Reporting of Overuse Injuries and Health Problems in Sport: An Update of the Oslo Sport Trauma Research Center Questionnaires

Clarsen B, Bahr R, Myklebust G, Moreau, W. British Journal of Sports Medicine 2020; 54:390-396.

Article presents the updated versions of the questionnaires (OSTRC-O2 and OSTRC-H2), assesses the likely impact of the updates on future data collection and discusses practical issues related to application of the questionnaires.

Access article.

Survey of Income Comparison: General Practice and Sports Certified Doctors of Chiropractic

Moreau W., Holder T., & Nabhan D. (2019, May). Journal of Chiropractic Medicine. 18(1), 42–47.

The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences in reported gross billings and collections between doctors of chiropractic who have obtained a certificate of additional qualification (CAQ) in sports medicine compared with those without a CAQ in sports medicine.

Access article.

Sport Concussion Knowledge and Clinical Practices: A Survey of Doctors of Chiropractic With Sports Certification

Moreau WJ, Nabhan DC, Walden T. J Chiropr Med. 2015 Sep;14(3):169-75. doi: 10.1016/j.jcm.2015.08.003. Epub 2015 Nov 18.

The purpose of this study is to describe the knowledge base and clinical practices regarding concussion by sports-certified doctors of chiropractic.

Access article.

Detection of Persisting Concussion Effects on Neuromechanical Responsiveness

Wilkerson GB, Nabhan DC, Prusmack CJ, Moreau WJ. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2018 Sep;50(9):1750-1756. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001647. PMID: 29683918.

Assessment of various indices of neuromechanical responsiveness for association with concussion history.

Access article.

Routine Screening for Iron Deficiency Is an Important Component of Athlete Care

Chapman R., Sinex J., Wilber R., Kendig A., Moreau W., Nabhan D., & Stray-Gundersen J. (2017, November). Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2017, 49 (11): 2364; DOI: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001358.

We feel that the authors’ conclusion suggesting that “given the high costs of testing, screening practices at each institution should be thoughtfully selected and routinely reassessed” is not appropriate given the limitations inherent in their analysis, the existing literature supporting iron status monitoring, and the complete cost–benefit ratio for athletes and their universities.

Access article.

Routine Screening for Iron Deficiency Is an Important Component of Athlete Care

Chapman R., Sinex J., Wilber R., Kendig A., Moreau W., Nabhan D., & Stray-Gundersen J. (2017, November). Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2017, 49 (11): 2364; DOI: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001358.

We feel that the authors’ conclusion suggesting that “given the high costs of testing, screening practices at each institution should be thoughtfully selected and routinely reassessed” is not appropriate given the limitations inherent in their analysis, the existing literature supporting iron status monitoring, and the complete cost–benefit ratio for athletes and their universities.

Access article.